Welcome to the third episode of our podcast, 3 Lessons from Breakthrough Leaders

In this episode, we are joined by Janine Chamberlin, who is UK Country Manager and VP – Global Clients Program at LinkedIn.

Janine was the thirteenth employee to walk through the doors of LinkedIn offices in London a decade ago. She has experienced the growth of LinkedIn first-hand and has personally helped grow the business from the ground up. You can find Janine’s LinkedIn profile here.

Listen to the S1 E3 ‘Business Culture & Wellbeing’ with Janine 

               

In this episode, we will learn about these 3 lessons from Janine

  • How skills build diversity 
  • No preconceptions – Learning outside the box
  • LinkedIn’s lockdown learnings

This podcast was recorded during the summer of 2021.


If you enjoyed this episode, make sure you subscribe to this podcast and please do leave us a review and rating on your player of choice. We will be updating you on upcoming episodes on our social media so remember to follow us.

The music used in this podcast was composed for Breakthrough Global and has been used on our Programmes throughout the years
Hosts: Dr Bart Sayle, CEO and Founder of Breakthrough Global and Zannah Ryabchuk, Managing Director at Breakthrough Global
Production: Julia Soltysova at Breakthrough Global and Robin Leeburn at Fairly Media


Transcript of the episode

Zannah Ryabchuk

Hello, and welcome to a brand new podcast: 3 Lessons from Breakthrough Leaders. I’m Zannah Ryabchuk, MD at Breakthrough Global.

Bart Sayle

And I’m Dr. Bart Sayle, CEO and founder at Breakthrough Global, where we’ve spent the past 30 years developing the Breakthrough methodology to help transform companies looking to reach the highest level.

Zannah Ryabchuk

And in this podcast, we’ll meet the world’s foremost leaders and creative talents, distilling their knowledge and experience into three lessons, which we guarantee will help you and your companies to unleash your potential. And Bart and I will take a moment to analyse the key takeaways and the opportunity for Breakthrough thinking that arises from each one. In today’s episode, we hear from Janine Chamberlain, who is the UK country manager at LinkedIn and head of enterprise sales, talent solutions. And today, we’ll be learning these three lessons, skills build diversity.

Janine Chamberlin

There’s often debate about do you want to look for a cultural fit within the company? Or do you want to look for cultural adds, like what someone is going to add to your organisation? And someone actually said, maybe it is about cultural add, but a value fit?

Zannah Ryabchuk

No preconceptions.

Janine Chamberlin

Have you seen the series? Ted Lasso? Yes, it’s amazing. I mean, talk about leadership. Right. And he talks about don’t judge be curious. And and I think it’s just such a great way of kind of leading and even living your life.

Zannah Ryabchuk

LinkedIn lockdown learnings.

Janine Chamberlin

I realised that there are things that helped me to recharge my battery. And they may not be the standard stereotypical things that you read, you know, that you read about. So I, for example, this is maybe a little bit embarrassing, but people who know me know about this anyway, I love karaoke. So you can imagine the last 15 months have been really hard for me because doing karaoke by yourself at home is really boring.

Bart Sayle

And now let’s start. Lesson one, culture add, values fit.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So Janine, what’s some of your advice for companies who are looking for that talent? And what some of your advice for people who are looking for that perfect role? What should they do?

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah, so if I can start with the people, like, first and foremost, I think coming off of a really, really challenging year, don’t give up. Because really, there are better times coming. And I think there is so much that you can do to to make yourself stand out. Right, I’m not even saying stand out from others stand out as someone who has the right skills for a specific role. So evidently, we already had this trend of everything becoming more digital. And that’s just accelerated in the last 12 to 15 months. So the vast majority of companies that I work with, they are hiring for people with technical skills, with digital skills with engineering skills. And equally, and I obviously have to say this, like reach out to your network, we’ve seen a lot of people become much more open about the fact that they are looking for a job right now. You know, at some point, there might have been a stigma on that in the past, where it’s not really cool to not be in a job, people are open about it now. They can even put a little banner on their LinkedIn profile pictures that says I am open to work. And guess what, they get 40% more responses from recruiters, and they get 20% more outreach from their network because people want to help each other. And you know, we work a lot with organisations and encourage organisations to shift to more of a skills based assessment of candidates. So forget about the formal qualifications. I’m not saying they don’t count or don’t matter. But you know, you learn skills in so many different ways. And we really encourage companies to look at that because it helps to open up a much larger, more diverse pool of talents.

Zannah Ryabchuk

It absolutely works. I mean, that’s something that we implemented ourselves here a few years ago, I think we were very hung up on this certainly for myself on, certainly qualifications and certain different things that we were, you know, that would help us also to just whittle through the vast numbers of applicants and things. And actually, it really took you know, somebody who was very, very skilled in diversity and inclusion to come in and review our whole process. And I think there’s a huge amount of positive feeling that I have for that, because it’s completely opened up our process to be more diverse to expose us to some fantastic candidates who wouldn’t have got through with some of those checkbox things before.

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah, absolutely.

Bart Sayle

And I think to add to that, I was reading Piketty’s book on capital, and it’s an incredible book, and it’s a it’s really about equality across the world. And one of his findings is that one way to decrease inequality is by the diffusion of knowledge and the increase of skills. And that that’s not just for business that’s across the world. And I think LinkedIn is a platform that’s doing that. The other thing I was going to say is, I suppose, where we’ve, where we’ve made mistakes, recruiting hasn’t really been about skills. But it’s really on values.

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah, absolutely. I was recently having a conversation exactly about about this. And we were talking about culture and values. And and, you know, there’s often debate about, do you want to look for a cultural fit within the company? Or do you want to look for cultural ads, like what someone going to add to your organisation, and someone actually said, you know, maybe it is about cultural add, but a value fit. Right. And I think that was a really great way of describing because you do want to make sure that there is alignment between someone’s individual purpose to some extent, and and what you’re trying to achieve as an organisation. So I really liked that framing.

Bart Sayle

Yeah, I like that. So if we just dwell on that a moment, what are some of the significant changes you’ve seen in LinkedIn, in terms of culture, from number 13, through to a global powerhouse.

Janine Chamberlin

Oh, I feel like it’s almost sounds like a sort of a fantasy story. But we’ve had our culture and values are like a written culture, cultural tenants and our value statements, and they’ve been the same. With some very slight tweaks, literally, over the last 13 years, that’s been very consistent. And if you talk to any of our employees, you’ll hear people say, well, it doesn’t matter what office I go into, I feel that it is LinkedIn, I feel that it is the same environment. And I think that’s really underpinned by the culture and values that we talk about a lot. We celebrate them a lot we recognise when, you know, we see people live and breathe these culture and values. So that’s actually been very consistent.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Thats so interesting to hear, because what we always say is, or we ask, are you managing your culture, or is your culture managing you, because if you’re not actively shaping it, then it can evolve into something that you really didn’t want. And it happens so slowly, and so kind of carefully, that you can kind of, it can happen in the space of a couple of years, and you don’t even notice it, and suddenly you walk into the room, anything. This isn’t the picture that we had a few years ago. And it’s very hard. We’ve seen this, you know, with organisations that grow rapidly, it is very hard to keep that consistency in that cohesion. And that feeling that wherever you are in the world, you’re part of the same team. And I just think it’s fascinating that you’ve been able to do that, and a testament to maybe the quality of those values and culture that you had written down from the very beginning.

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah, and to our senior leadership, I think everybody always leads with the culture and values, you know, from the CEO, down. And I think that that’s a huge win for us, because it really makes a big difference.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So Janine, really understood what I was explaining there around the concept of are you managing your culture, or is your culture managing you? And the reason that we understand that culture is the absolute foundation of all organisational high performance. Its because it is so much of what what an organisation is culture is everything isn’t it Bart.

Bart Sayle

Yes, culture is everything. And there’s so much written about culture, so many books. But we’ve simplified culture into just a number of distinctions. So culture is the collective mindset of the organisation. It’s the behaviour that flows from that collective mindset. It’s the beliefs that support that behaviour. And it’s the communication that reinforces that, that’s our idea of culture. And that accounts for about 80% of what a collective organisational culture is. So they are the drivers that we use. And we use those to guide our clients into really creating and shaping a powerful culture that can help them to reach their potential.

Zannah Ryabchuk

And as Janine says, it’s absolutely critical that culture is underpinned by real values, real values that the leaders actually walk and talk. Because how many times Bart, have we been into an organisation where you’ve got some very generic words that sit on a meeting room wall, but nobody’s actually living those values and therefore the culture is very mismatched and misaligned, and critically, a misaligned culture is not going to be able to deliver the strategy and execute that strategy effectively. So let’s get back into the conversation with Janine.

Bart Sayle

Lesson two, learning outside the box.

Bart Sayle

When I go back and I think of LinkedIn, I think of our business, our business is 28 years old this year. And one of the things that LinkedIn has been incredible for is that in those early days, I can remember that it was almost impossible to keep track with the people who participated in our programmes. And and the first time I saw LinkedIn, I must say, I thought, oh, it’s for finding a new job. That’s what it’s for. But very quickly, we saw that this is a really fantastic way for us to keep in contact with our clients. And it’s took all that, that that that need away from us trying to do it. And it’s just phenomenal in how it’s helped our business and businesses like ours. And I wonder over that time, from a startup to what is now much more than a startup, it’s a global operation, giving global value to so many people. What are the things that what are the standouts for you, because you’ve been part of that growth from that entrepreneurial startup, to now, where you are as a major influence within business? What are some of the standouts that you’ve seen in that time?

Janine Chamberlin

You know, LinkedIn’s always had the same vision and mission. And our mission is to connect the world’s professionals, and make them more productive and successful. So it started off with that connection. But at a certain point, we hit, you know, almost like a critical mass, and we had enough people around the world who were connected. So then the focus shifted more onto to how do we actually help these people be more productive and be more successful in their careers, whatever that career might be. And so the focus has shifted to the creation of content and allowing people to connect, whether it’s through groups, or one to one, or share their story on the platform. And I think that’s been a really significant shift. It’s been an interesting journey to develop in so many different ways. And along the way, identify ways where we can add more value both to companies, and to our members, that that wasn’t really a plan that LinkedIn set up with 18 years ago, when it was founded it there was a need to connect people. And along the way, it’s grown out into this organisation that serves a lot of different purposes.

Zannah Ryabchuk

And I think that’s something that I find constantly is sort of interesting. And bringing my curiosity back into LinkedIn, is the idea that you are actually now producing so much content and having other people put content on the platform that helps us all to learn, that helps us to upskill that helps us to develop in such a wide range of different areas. I mean, there’s literally something for anyone, and you can just continue to learn, which is so important to the generations coming up. You know, we just, we have this thirst for learning and upskilling and finding out more and more and more in this incredible curiosity, which is really being served by LinkedIn, I think at the moment. But I know that you also have a huge sense of curiosity and learning. And maybe that’s why you have such a wonderful synergy with the company in which you work, if you could tell me a little bit about and tell our listeners a little bit about your backstory and some of the qualifications and experiences that you had brought you to where you are now.

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah. So I think the reason why I joined LinkedIn, or rather, the reason why LinkedIn hired me was because at that particular moment in time, I had a skill set that was fairly unique. And so I was there at the right moment in time when they were looking for someone who could work through the the online advertising, operational side of things. And I had absolutely no idea what meeting would grow into, right. And I remember talking to my parents as you do, because I had just moved to the UK from Holland, about two years prior, I was working Telecom, and had a good job. And my parents were like, what are you doing? Why would you join this company that nobody’s even ever heard of, you know, you’re, you’re in a really solid sort of trusted organisation. I don’t understand why you’re making this move. And I said, oh, but I’ve had a few conversations, and the people are so nice. And, you know, I just felt this connection with them. So I’m going to do it anyway. And that’s how I how I joined LinkedIn. And because we were such a small startup, you know, you get involved in every part of the organisation very quickly. So you learn about a very broad spectrum of the functions and different skills that are required to ultimately, you know, grow into running a business and that’s really helped me over the last sort of 13 years to move between different functions between different parts of the business, and really get to know the company inside out in a lot of different ways, which, you know, especially in the last year, I think has helped me to accelerate my career because I have this broad view of the business. And there were some opportunities that really aligned to my my LinkedIn background very specifically. Now, four or five years into my career at LinkedIn, I did start, sort of I had this nagging feeling already for many, many years, I’ve never gone to a university. And now I actually want people not to think about qualifications, I think we should all look for skills in people. But for me, personally, there was something that made me think, I always wanted to go to university and I found this Master’s course, which was focused on change and coaching within organisations. And I thought it just really appealed to me, it was a very introspective course, as well. So not so much focused on very hard skills, it was really about all of the soft skills. And I did that course at NCR, it took me about two years. And it was huge for the work that I was doing at LinkedIn. Right. So one of the things that I will always talk to people about, if you find yourself at this kind of crossroads, I think we all have those moments in our careers where you’re like, not sure I want to be doing what I’m doing. Now I need to find something else, we often look for those opportunities within the organisation where we are, and we might not find them straightaway. And then we get a little bit deflated. Because it’s like, well, there’s no career opportunity for me here. Where do I go. And for me, I think when I hit a certain point like that, to actually go and do something away from your company, brings back a sort of energy that you can then inject back into your job at the company that you work for. So it was super helpful for me to kind of take that step away. It was part time, I still worked. But then every single time that I went for my couple of days, sort of university learning, I came back to work refreshed and re energised. And I had all these new ideas from different people that I met through through that. And it’s really helped me in, you know, my job at LinkedIn as well.

Zannah Ryabchuk

What was maybe one of your biggest insights from that experience? What was the thing that you’ve really, really implemented, maybe more than anything else?

Janine Chamberlin

So I mean, for me, personally, the biggest, the biggest learning that I had through through the course is that I grew my confidence massively. And that’s something that I’ve always really struggled with, and still do now, right? I, I see confidence as a skill and a skill that you constantly need to train and retrain. Because it comes and goes with different things that happen in your work life and in your personal life. So I’m always kind of focused on that. But the course itself gave me the skills to reflect and not just reflect on the things that I don’t do well, but also, you know, be brave enough to reflect on the things that I’m proud of, and and then use that as a way to continue to, to grow and share that with other people.

Bart Sayle

Great. As you’ve gone through your career, what sort of leadership principles that have been important to you?

Janine Chamberlin

I think, first and foremost, connection with people is important to me. So listening to the people that I work with, understand where they are coming from, where they see opportunities, where they see challenges, and then, you know, bringing people together ultimately, to understand, you know, what do we want to achieve next? And how are we going to achieve that. So I would say I’m not someone who’s very authoritative. I like to collaborate and kind of co-create with the people that I work with that, I would say has been very important to me. You know, when I look at other leaders, I really value traits, such as honesty and transparency, even when it’s not always possible to be completely transparent. I think, you know, there’s still a way that we can say, I can’t be transparent about every single step. But here’s what I can tell you. Right. I think that’s really, really important to me, compassion, really trying to understand where somebody else is coming from. Not judging someone. I don’t know if you’ve seen the series. This is a bit cheesy, but have you seen the series Ted Lasso? Yes, it’s amazing. I mean, talk about leadership. Right. And he talks about, don’t judge be curious. And and I think it’s just such a great way of kind of leading and even living your life, right. So rather than having all your preconceived ideas about people just be curious, try and understand what’s going on and why things are happening the way they’re happening. I think sometimes, you know, we only look at maybe top level, the results, the numbers or whatever it is, and you miss what’s going on underneath that. And if you miss that for a long enough time, you’re going to actually start seeing gaps appear because you haven’t been paying attention to what’s really happening within your team or within your organisation. So that’s really important to me.

Zannah Ryabchuk

It’s very interesting to hear Jeanine talk about the need for transparency, and particularly that phrase she used, which said, sometimes we can’t tell you everything. But I’m telling you that we can’t do everything in this situation, here’s what I can share with you. And it’s so often that we work with leaders who feel that if they can’t share everything, they share nothing. And all that happens in that situation is that people fill in the gaps. And they tend to fill it in with negative gossip, rather than hearing as much as they possibly can about what’s going on in that situation. And I think that healthy communication flow is absolutely fundamental to any transformation effort that we work on.

Bart Sayle

Healthy communication flow in an organisation is like blood flow in our body. So you need to keep that healthy, you need to keep it flowing. But saying that there are certain things that as a leader, you’re not really able to say. And one of the simplest things that can be done is to just specify what’s in scope, and what’s out of scope. And generally, once you can do that, people will accept that. And as you heard, Janine is a great example of this with her priority for honesty and transparency. And so on to lesson three, keep your ear to the ground.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So Janine, in the lead up to this podcast, we’ve had a few conversations about the current challenges that people are facing, because of course, the pandemic has had a dramatic impact on everybody. And in some ways, it’s improved quality of life for some people. And for others, it’s really made things a lot, lot lot harder. And what are some of the insights that you can also share with us about the data that’s been gathered by LinkedIn on how the pandemic has impacted the way that people work and live every day.

Janine Chamberlin

Well, I totally agree with you. It’s been a an incredibly difficult year for people and a lot of organisations use employee surveys, and one of the survey tools is Glint that’s owned by LinkedIn. And this is how we can gather that data. And so a lot of organisations have started asking questions during the pandemic, just how are you doing? And you know, through those types of questions, and also the comments that come into those surveys from people, we can actually analyse what people are talking about within those comments. And so we saw an increase in the number of people talking about burnout, for example. So people are really feeling this, I think what’s really interesting is that women talk about this even more than men. There’s a difference of 20% women talk about this so much more than men, and I think women have taken the lion’s share of domestic duties of childcare. And so I think it’s safe to say that the pandemic has, unfortunately impacted women in their careers a lot more. But generally speaking, I think people became tired towards the end of last year tired of the constant, you know, am I am I working at home? Or am I living at work is something that I’ve heard quite a lot, and that really resonates with me, you’re constantly in the same space, but you’re juggling all these different things. And so by actually listening carefully, through these kind of surveys, to your employees, understanding what they are feeling, I have seen companies taken a lot of action to make sure that they support their employees through the pandemic, and making sure that, you know, it’s sustainable, because not only the work, but I think the the stress or the anxiety of knowing what’s happening in the world, family members who might have been impacted by COVID employees themselves who have been impacted by COVID. So I think it all added up to a really challenging time. And that’s just talking about people who who are still in a job. Think about those of us who haven’t been able to continue to work who either lost their jobs, or were put on furlough, those numbers are not to be underestimated, either. So I think generally, it’s been a really tough time. And we can see it through all of the different data points.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So what are some of the tools and the skills and you know, what can we do to really pull that back because I already believed that there was an overload or kind of epidemic before the before the actual pandemic, because of the conversations I had day to day with people who were really really exhausted. Yeah.

Janine Chamberlin

It’s so hard, isn’t it? I often think it’s, it’s connected to communication, like the overload comes from an overload of communication, often more meetings, more emails more, whatever it is, like messages in teams messages, and all of these different things, because you want to keep people as informed and updated on things as possible. But the result is that it’s very overwhelming for people what they receive. And I always think the person who’s gonna, you know, invent something to do that, well, they’re gonna make a lot of money. I think there’s something in this. But, you know, in the meanwhile, I do think it’s about empowering employees to make those decisions that are in their own best interest. So if you need to stop at six o’clock, five o’clock, four o’clock, three o’clock doesn’t matter. Like you need to be empowered to make that decision to work, the schedule that you want to work, because that’s how you can work it around whatever other responsibilities you’re having, or just make sure that you take that time for yourself. And how do you empower people, obviously, is by leading by example, I don’t think it works to enforce specific rules about this, like, you know, you read about should organisations, stop sending emails after a certain time. I don’t know that that works. Because if I’m working parents, and I actually want to take a break between three o’clock in the afternoon and seven o’clock when my kids go to bed, then then that whole thing might not work for me because I want the flexibility, right? So it’s about trusting people that they will deliver on the job that you’re expecting them to deliver on, but have them do it in the way that suits them.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So Janine, what are some of the things that you do to manage your energy and your well-being?

Janine Chamberlin

I wouldn’t say that I’m like a poster child of, you know, managing my own well-being, but I tried as best as I can. And I’ve experimented with a lot. I think I started off from a point of, you know, you read about mindfulness, you read about meditation and I thought, well, that’s what I need to do. And I actually find that really, really hard. So over the last many years, I realised that there are things that helped me to recharge my battery, and they may not be the standard, stereotypical things that you read, you know, that you read about. So I, for example, this is maybe a little bit embarrassing, but people who know me know about this anyway, I love karaoke. So you can imagine the last 15 months have been really hard for me because doing karaoke by yourself at home is really boring. And my family are not interested in joining me in karaoke. But, I like that that’s like an enormous release for me. And so you can obviously sing along with songs. And that is something that can really change my mood. And so I try and do the kinds of things where, you know, I try and pay attention rather to what’s recharging my battery, and what’s draining my battery, and how do I make sure that I balance my time, you know, more or less evenly between the two, because there are some things that you have to do for work that sometimes drain you. And I just need to make sure that I then take the time to recharge my battery. But equally, you know I live outside of London, and it’s beautiful, lots of green, lots of places to go for a walk, I have two dogs. And I like to take they’re absolutely bonkers, by the way, but I like to take them out for a walk and just you know, step away from the desk. Also, just during work, the things that I’ve kind of adopted in the last year especially is to not have every conversation or every meeting on the screen. You know, it can just as well be a phone call. And actually going out for a walk together with someone else is great. There are some of my best conversations, not even meeting face to face, because oftentimes that hasn’t been possible, but just both being on a call and making sure that that you get that outside air at the same time. So for me, those are some of the things that I that I keep myself in check. And you know, as I mentioned at the start, when I started feeling a little bit stuck at certain points in my career, the thing for me to do is to go outside of work and find something else like either a hobby or a course or whatever it may be, and I still operate that way.

Bart Sayle

What’s your favourite karaoke song?

Janine Chamberlin

Valerie by Amy Winehouse.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Thats a good karaoke song. Oh, it’s so good. We play that on the programmes quite a bit actually. And it always gets people in a good mood. It’s an immediate mood lifters.

Janine Chamberlin
Exactly. It’s tough though. I wish I could sing. Like Amy Winehouse and I definitely can’t. This is the thing people always think Oh, because you love karaoke so much. You’re probably very good at singing and I’m really, really not anybody who’s been singing with me can testify.

Bart Sayle

So the data from LinkedIn Janine has shared with us really supports what we’ve been seeing for years now, working with clients in Breakthrough, one of the key priorities for people, is well-being, and it’s been well-being at work, but recently, with the COVID phenomena, work is now at home. So it’s well-being at home and at work. And people are feeling it more and more. One of our beliefs is that well-being is actually a competency. And it’s something that you can be good at, or it’s something that you’ve not been good at. But wherever you are, you can learn to be better, and you can learn to manage it. But the key thing is, you’ve got to take responsibility for it. And that’s where there’s a big gap. Because some people believe that the responsibility for well-being is with the employer. It’s not, it’s with the individual. But it’s up to the employers, and particularly the leaders to enable and empower their people to take responsibility for their well-being. And that, for me, is what I call Enlightened Leadership.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Absolutely Bart. And we’ve seen that completely in our conversations with our community now that well-being has gone from a nice to have to an absolute must have. And certainly, I think it’d be fantastic for everyone’s well-being to be doing a bit more karaoke to Valerie from time to time. Now, onto our hot seat. This is the part of the show at the end of each episode, where we ask our guests quickfire questions to learn more about their views on life, what’s important to them, and to learn about their habits for high performance. So Janine, are you ready for your hot seat? Questions? Yes. Okay, let’s fire away with the first one. So what brings you energy and motivation in everyday life? We’ve touched on this a little bit before, but maybe there’s some quick answers you can give to this?

Janine Chamberlin

Yeah, I mean, if I think about everyday life, there’s all these activities that helped me, but ultimately, you know, why do I get up in the morning, it’s because of my son, who’s turning 11 In three weeks. And you know, he’s absolutely my sort of shining, shining light, and I do a lot for him, I want to prove to him as well, that, you know, you can achieve a lot of things in life if you set your mind to it. And I guess that’s where I get my energy and inspiration from I have something to prove to my to my boy.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Well, happy birthday to him for three weeks time.

Janine Chamberlin

Thank you.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So finish this sentence success is …

Janine Chamberlin

Finding joy in something everyday.

Zannah Ryabchuk

I like that.

Zannah Ryabchuk

So what inspires you in life?

Janine Chamberlin

Oh what inspires me in life? I get inspired by all sorts of things. But I guess, you know, I have a professional mindset today, what inspires me is seeing strong female leaders, my role models, and and there’s plenty of them. And it can be leaders that I don’t agree with, like Margaret Thatcher, or it can be someone like Michelle Obama, who I just think is absolutely incredible. I take a lot of inspiration from those individuals.

Zannah Ryabchuk

I think that’s perfect. Thank you so much. So if our listeners would like to kind of get in touch with you, or maybe ask a question or find out a bit more about you, what’s the best way for them to do that? Is that to just connect with you on LinkedIn? Or is there somewhere else that they can find you?

Janine Chamberlin

Absolutely. LinkedIn? Yes, my profile is public. Please do reach out to me. I would actually love to hear from people questions or any feedback. I, I’m always open to everything. So definitely come and look me up on LinkedIn.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Fantastic. Janine, thank you so much. It’s been an absolute pleasure having you as a guest on the show. Thank you to Bart, as well. And we wish you all the best.

Bart Sayle

Thank you Janine.

Janine Chamberlin

Thank you.

Bart Sayle

It’s been delightful, it really has.

Janine Chamberlin

Thank you.

Zannah Ryabchuk

Thank you for joining us for today’s three lessons. Do make sure you hit the subscribe button and join us each month for another 3 Lessons from Breakthrough Leaders. And you can reach out to us at Breakthrough Global on LinkedIn or Facebook, or via Twitter at Radiant Carity or on Instagram at Global Breakthrough.

Bart Sayle

And we’d love to hear from you, your feedback and your own leadership stories. We’d also love for you to share this episode on your own social media and review and rate this podcast on your player of choice as we want to spread these transformative lessons as widely as possible.

Zannah Ryabchuk

And finally a huge thanks to our production team Julia Soltysova at Breakthrough Global and Robin Leeburn at Fairly media, and of course, thank you for listening. See you next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai